Primitive Inspired Gardens
Submitted by willowtreeprimitives  2009
Click on thumbnail to enlarge photo
Submitted by primkarlee 2009
"Hello Birdie?!" 
Submitted by 
Maggie's Farm
Damon, 18 months 
Submitted by willowtreeprimitives  2009
Submitted by The Hirt Homestead 2009
Submitted by The Hirt Homestead 2009
Submitted by The Hirt Homestead 2009
Submitted by Winterberry Farm 2009
Submitted by Winterberry Farm 2009
Submitted by Maggie's Farm
Submitted by Maggie's Farm 2009
Photo Right: Pam filled an old wooden wheelbarrow full of potted flowers which makes a nice focal point in her garden. 
Photo Left:
One-of-a-kind items, such as a birdbath, can stand alone, but collections show better when grouped together. Pam created a focal point with her watering can collection by lining them up on an old wooden bench along a fence.

Photo Left:
Climbing plants soften hard outlines. Planting clematis, morning glory, a climbing rose or vine will soften the hard outline of a wall, building edge or fence. Not only will climbing vines soften a hard edge, they will also bring your attention to a point of interest in your landscape, such as a garden arbor, trellis, pergola or garden shed.
Photo Right:
Shades of green add a touch of serenity to this storage shed. An old wooden door propped up against the side wall adds nice contrast and added interest. 

Photo Right: 
Think outside of the box - Pam wasn't afraid to take her crocks outside and fill them with potted flowers. She also created a nice focal point by filling an old washtub with purple, pink and yellow trailing flowers. The tall distressed birdhouse gives additional height and added interest to her outdoor display.
Photo Left: 
New uses for old things - Pam added old wooden crates, a vintage water pump and old hand tools in her display.

Photo Left: 
Other people's junk is your treasure! Lisa put to use an old bicylce in her garden. She wrapped some grapevine around it and gave it a garden sign. Be on the lookout for old bicylces at yard sales or thrift stores. Don't be afraid to spray paint your bike. You can also wire an old basket to the front and add artificial flowers or a pot of real flowers. Change out with the season, adding mums in the fall and fresh evergreen and berries in the winter!
Photo Right: Creating curvy edges to your flower beds will keep the eye moving. Before building your flower bed, lay a garden hose out on the ground to create your "curvy edges". Sprinkle flour along the edges as your guide.
Photo Left: 
Be on the lookout for "rusty junk" at yard and garage sales, barn sales or thrift stores. Another great time to look for treasures is during Spring clean-up when people throw their unwanted items on the curb! Just look at this cute little child size chair all worn and rusty...a perfect addition to this prim garden!

Submitted by colony homestead 2009
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Photo Right: 
Instead of installing an entire fence, buy just one or two fence sections and plan a miniature garden around it for a nice focal point.
Submitted by spang 2009
Photo Below: 
Mary has converted a large portion of her backyard into a no-mow landscape. She incorporated rock pathways to allow easy access to her flowers.

Submitted by spang 2009
Submitted by spang 2009
Photo Right: 
Birdfeeders and birdbaths are an open invitation for Mary's feathered friends.
Photo Right: 
Left-over stepping stones set in rock form a simple pathway. Flowers and plants draping over the path's edge soften the line of the hard materials used to build it.
Photo Left: 
Mary divides her perennials as they spread. She then shares with friends or transplants to a new area.
Daylilies, iris and hostas are all easy plants to divide and are great for swaping with friends!
Bring on the Butterflies!
Below is a small sample list of flowers that will atract butterflies!
Aster
Bee Balm
Black-eyed Susan
Butterfly Bush
Butterfly Weed
Coneflower (Echinacea)
Coreopsis
Phlox
Sweet William
Sedum
Verbena
Yarrow
Zinnia
Submitted by spang 2009
Welcome to Walker Homestead Gardens
Submitted by Walker Homestead 2010
Submitted by Walker Homestead 2010
Submitted by Walker Homestead 2010
Submitted by Walker Homestead 2010
Submitted by Walker Homestead 2010
Submitted by Walker Homestead 2010
Photo Right: 
You can create a focal point in your garden by building a circular bed in the center of your garden. Surround it with a circular path made out of brick, flagstone or pavers. It creates an unusual point of interest. 
Submitted by Walker Homestead 2010
Photo Above:  Intertwine grapevine to make an interesting rustic looking fence. 
Photo Above:  Tepees are perfect for growing green beans and sugar snap peas. You can also grow morning glories or other climbing flowering plants, creating a neat focal point and a conversation piece.
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P.O. Box 9979, Fargo, ND 58106